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Important update: Healthcare facilities

CDC has updated select ways to operate healthcare systems effectively in response to COVID-19 vaccination.
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UPDATE
Given new evidence on the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant, CDC has updated the guidance for fully vaccinated people. CDC recommends universal indoor masking for all teachers, staff, students, and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status. Children should return to full-time in-person learning in the fall with layered prevention strategies in place.

UPDATE
The White House announced that vaccines will be required for international travelers coming into the United States, with an effective date of November 8, 2021. For purposes of entry into the United States, vaccines accepted will include FDA approved or authorized and WHO Emergency Use Listing vaccines. More information is available here.

UPDATE
Travel requirements to enter the United States are changing, starting November 8, 2021. More information is available here.

How to Protect Yourself and OthersHow to Protect Yourself and Others

Updated Oct. 19, 2022

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COVID-19 Prevention Actions
There are many ways your actions can help protect you, your household, and your community from severe illness from COVID-19. CDC’s COVID-19 Community Levels provide information about the amount of severe illness in the community where you are located to help you decide when to take action to protect yourself and others.

Prevention Actions to Use at All COVID-19 Community Levels
In addition to basic health and hygiene practices, like handwashing, CDC recommends some prevention actions at all COVID-19 Community Levels, which include:

Staying Up to Date with COVID-19 Vaccines
Improving Ventilation
Getting Tested for COVID-19 If Needed
Following Recommendations for What to Do If You Have Been Exposed

Staying Home If You Have Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19
Seeking Treatment If You Have COVID-19 and Are at High Risk of Getting Very Sick
Avoiding Contact with People Who Have Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19

Build Your Personal COVID-19 PlanPut together your COVID-19 plan so you have all the information you need on hand if you get sick with COVID-19. Download, edit and save, and share your plan with your family, friends, and healthcare provider.
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Staying Up to Date with COVID-19 Vaccines

COVID-19 vaccines help your body develop protection from the virus that causes COVID-19. Although vaccinated people sometimes get infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, staying up to date on COVID-19 vaccines significantly lowers the risk of getting very sick, being hospitalized, or dying from COVID-19. CDC recommends that everyone who is eligible get a booster and stay up to date on their COVID-19 vaccines, especially people with weakened immune systems.
If you are moderately or severely immunocompromised or severely allergic to COVID-19 vaccines: Talk with a healthcare provider about whether you are eligible for a medicine called  EVUSHELD™ that you can take before you are exposed or test positive for COVID-19. This medicine contains two different antibodies and is given by your healthcare provider every 6 months.  EVUSHELD™ may offer less protection against certain strains of the Omicron variant. It is important that even if you receive  EVUSHELD™, you take multiple prevention measures. See additional information for making a COVID-19 plan to protect yourself from infection.
EVUSHELD™ EUA Fact Sheet for Patients, Parents and Caregivers

To find COVID-19 vaccine locations near you: Search vaccines.gov, text your ZIP code to 438829, or call 1-800-232-0233.

Improving Ventilation and Spending Time Outdoors

Improving ventilation (moving air into, out of, or within a room) and filtration (trapping particles on a filter to remove them from the air) can help prevent virus particles from accumulating in indoor air. Improving ventilation and filtration can help protect you from getting infected with and spreading the virus that causes COVID-19. Spending time outside when possible instead of inside can also help: Viral particles spread between people more readily indoors than outdoors.
Actions that can improve ventilation and filtration include:

Bringing in as much outdoor air as possible—for example, opening windows.
Increasing air filtration in your heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system, such as by changing filters frequently and using filters that are properly fitted and provide higher filtration.
Using portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) cleaners.
Turning on exhaust fans and using other fans to improve air flow.
Turning your thermostat to the “ON” position instead of “AUTO” to ensure your HVAC system provides continuous airflow and filtration.

CDC’s interactive ventilation tools can help you see how much you can improve ventilation in your home or school.
Moving indoor activities outdoors
You are less likely to be infected with COVID-19 during outdoor activities because virus particles do not build up in the air outdoors as much as they do indoors. As the COVID-19 Community Level rises, consider increasing the number of group activities you move outside.
Financial support may be available to certain entities, like schools, to make ventilation improvements.
Getting Tested for COVID-19 If Needed

Get tested if you have COVID-19 symptoms. A viral test tells you if you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19. There are two types of viral tests: rapid tests and laboratory tests. These tests might use samples from your nose or throat, or saliva. Knowing if you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 allows you to take care of yourself and take actions to reduce the chance that you will infect others.
CDC’s Viral Testing Tool is an online, mobile-friendly tool that asks a series of questions and recommends actions and resources based on your responses. It can help you interpret what your test result means.
You can also access tests the following ways:

Order free self-tests at COVIDtests.gov. Free tests are also available through local health departments.
If you have Medicare Part B, including those enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan, Medicare will cover up to 8 free self-tests each calendar month from participating pharmacies and providers. Private health insurance may also reimburse the cost of purchasing self-tests. Visit FDA’s website for a list of authorized tests.
Call your healthcare provider, visit a community testing site, or call your local health department for more options.

Following Recommendations for What to Do If You Have Been Exposed

If you were exposed to someone with COVID-19, you may have been infected with the virus. Follow CDC’s recommendations for what to do if you were exposed. This includes wearing a high-quality mask when indoors around others (including inside your home) for 10 days, testing, and monitoring yourself for symptoms.
Staying Home When You Have Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19

If you have COVID-19, you can spread it to others, even if you do not have symptoms. If you have symptoms, get tested and stay home until you have your results. If you have tested positive (even without symptoms), follow CDC’s isolation recommendations. These recommendations include staying home and away from others for at least 5 days (possibly more, depending on how the virus affects you) and wearing a high-quality mask when indoors around others for a period of time.
Seeking Treatment If You Have COVID-19 and Are at High Risk of Getting Very Sick

Effective treatments are now widely available and free, and you may be eligible.

Contact your healthcare provider, health department, or Community Health Center to learn about treatment options.
Don’t delay! Treatment must be started within a few days after you first develop symptoms to be effective.
If you don’t have timely access to a healthcare provider, check if a Test to Treat location is in your community. You can get tested, receive a prescription from a healthcare provider (either onsite or by telehealth), and have it filled all at one location.

Avoiding Contact with People Who Have Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19

Avoiding contact with people who have COVID-19, whether or not they feel sick, can reduce your risk of catching the virus from them. If possible, avoid being around a person who has COVID-19 until they can safely end home isolation. Sometimes it may not be practical for you to stay away from a person who has COVID-19 or you may want to help take care of them. In those situations, use as many prevention strategies as you can, such as practicing hand hygiene, consistently and correctly wearing a high-quality mask, improving ventilation, and keeping your distance, when possible, from the person who is sick or who tested positive.
Top of PagePrevention Actions to Add as Needed
There are some additional prevention actions that may be done at any level, but CDC especially recommends considering in certain circumstances or at medium or high COVID-19 Community Levels.

Wearing Masks or Respirators
Increasing Space and Distance

Wearing Masks or Respirators

Masks are made to contain droplets and particles that you breathe, cough, or sneeze out. A variety of masks are available. Some masks provide a higher level of protection than others.
Respirators (for example, N95) are made to protect you by fitting closely on the face to filter out particles, including the virus that causes COVID-19. They can also block droplets and particles you breathe, cough, or sneeze out so you do not spread them to others. Respirators (for example, N95) provide higher protection than masks.
When wearing a mask or respirator (for example, N95), it is most important to choose one that you can wear correctly, that fits closely to your face over your mouth and nose, that provides good protection, and that is comfortable for you.
Increasing Space and Distance

Small particles that people breathe out can contain virus particles. The closer you are to a greater number of people, the more likely you are to be exposed to the virus that causes COVID-19. To avoid this possible exposure, you may want to avoid crowded areas, or keep distance between yourself and others. These actions also protect people who are at high risk for getting very sick from COVID-19 in settings where there are multiple risks for exposure.
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Additional Resources
COVID-19 Community Levels
Science Brief: SARS-CoV-2 Transmission
Science Brief: Indicators for Monitoring COVID-19 Community Levels and Making Public Health Recommendations
Science Brief: Community Use of Masks to Control the Spread of SARS-CoV-2
Science Brief: COVID-19 Vaccines and Vaccination

Last Updated Oct. 19, 2022 Source: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases

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