Benefits of Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine/COVID-19ワクチンを受ける利点(English)

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UPDATE
Given new evidence on the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant, CDC has updated the guidance for fully vaccinated people. CDC recommends universal indoor masking for all teachers, staff, students, and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status. Children should return to full-time in-person learning in the fall with layered prevention strategies in place.

UPDATE
The White House announced that vaccines will be required for international travelers coming into the United States, with an effective date of November 8, 2021. For purposes of entry into the United States, vaccines accepted will include FDA approved or authorized and WHO Emergency Use Listing vaccines. More information is available here.

UPDATE
Travel requirements to enter the United States are changing, starting November 8, 2021. More information is available here.

Benefits of Getting A COVID-19 VaccineBenefits of Getting A COVID-19 Vaccine

Updated Aug. 17, 2022

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What You Need to Know
There are many benefits of getting vaccinated against COVID-19.

COVID-19 vaccines available in the United States are safe and are effective at protecting people from getting seriously ill, being hospitalized, and even dying.
Getting children and teens vaccinated against COVID-19 can help keep them from getting very sick if they do get COVID-19.
Vaccinating children can also help relieve the strain on families by providing greater confidence in children participating in childcare, school, and other activities.
COVID-19 vaccines can offer added protection to people who had COVID-19, including protection against being hospitalized from a new infection, especially as variants continue to emerge.
As with vaccines for other diseases, people are protected best when they stay up to date with the recommended number of doses and boosters, when eligible.

A Safer, More Reliable Way to Build Protection
Getting a COVID-19 vaccine is a safer, more reliable way to build protection than getting sick with COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccination helps protect you by creating an antibody response without you having to experience potentially severe illness or post-COVID conditions.

Getting Sick

Getting sick with COVID-19 can cause severe illness or death, even in children, and we can’t reliably predict who will have mild or severe illness.
You may have long-term health issues after having COVID-19. Even people who do not have symptoms when they are first infected can have these ongoing health problems, also known as long COVID or post-COVID conditions.
These complications can appear after mild or severe COVID-19, or after multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C).

Symptoms associated with COVID-19 vaccination vs infection

Symptoms associated with COVID-19 vaccination vs infection

Symptoms Post COVID-19 Vaccination
Symptoms Post COVID-19 Infection

Cough
Muscle and joint pain
Headache
Trouble falling or staying asleep
Trouble concentrating

Limitations in physical activity
Feeling distressed about symptoms
Mental health challenges
Decreased school or daycare attendance
Missed opportunities for participation in sports, playdates, or other activities

Protection from COVID-19

While people can get some protection from having COVID-19, the level and length of that protection varies, especially as COVID-19 variants continue to emerge.

Immunity (protection) from infection can vary depending on how mild or severe someone’s illness was and their age.
Immunity from infection decreases over time.

Importantly, there is still no antibody test available that can reliably determine if a person is protected from further infection.

About VariantsMany viruses are constantly changing, including the virus that causes COVID-19. These changes occur over time and can lead to the emergence of variants that may have new characteristics, including different ways of spreading.
Children, Teens, or Adults Who Have Already Had COVID-19 Should Still Get Vaccinated
Data from ongoing studies show evidence that people can get added protection by getting vaccinated after having been infected with the virus that causes COVID-19. Even if you have had COVID-19, you should still get vaccinated.
For anyone who has been infected with COVID-19, their next dose can be delayed 3 months from when symptoms started or, if they did not have symptoms, when they received a positive test. This possible delay can happen with a primary dose or a booster dose.
Read more about immunity from COVID-19 infection and vaccination.
COVID-19 Vaccines Are Effective
COVID 19-vaccines are effective at protecting people from getting seriously ill, being hospitalized, and even dying.
CDC recommends everyone ages 6 months and older stay up to date with their vaccines, which includes everyone 5 years and older getting boosters if eligible, for the best protection against COVID-19.
People who have certain medical conditions or who are taking medications that weaken their immune system are at increased risk of severe COVID-19 illness and death. Additionally, their immune response to COVID-19 vaccination may not be as strong as in people who are not immunocompromised. People who are moderately or severely immunocompromised have specific recommendations for COVID-19 vaccines, including boosters.
Read more about risk factors for severe COVID-19 in children published in Pediatrics, childhood COVID-19-related hospitalizations published in MMWR, and weekly summaries of COVID-19 hospitalization data through COVID-NET.
COVID-19 vaccines were first authorized for emergency use in the U.S. in December 2020.  Studies following the use of the vaccines showed approximately 90% protection against symptomatic infection, severe illness, and death. By July 2021, we saw decreased vaccine effectiveness against infection as new variants emerged, and CDC put forward recommendations to continue masking, even for people who had received a primary series. Over the ensuing months and in the context of updated vaccine booster recommendations, more than 20 ACIP meetings have publicly reviewed data on vaccine effectiveness and have provided real-time data demonstrating COVID-19 vaccines and boosters remain highly protective against severe illness and death. Importantly, the rates of COVID-19–associated hospitalizations and deaths are substantially higher among unvaccinated adults than among those who have received a primary series and those who are up to date with recommended COVID-19 vaccination, particularly among adults aged ≥65 years. Protection provided by the current vaccines against symptomatic infection and transmission is less than that against severe disease and diminishes over time, especially against the currently circulating variants. For this reason, it is important to stay up to date, especially as new vaccines become available.
COVID-19 Vaccines Are Safe for Children and Adults
While COVID-19 vaccines were developed quickly, all steps have been taken to ensure their safety and effectiveness.

COVID-19 vaccines were developed using science that has been around for decades.
Before COVID-19 vaccines were recommended, scientists conducted clinical trials with thousands of children and adults and found no serious safety concerns.
Hundreds of millions of people in the United States have received COVID-19 vaccines under the most intensive safety monitoring program in U.S. history.
Serious side effects that could cause a long-term health problem are rare following any vaccination, including COVID-19 vaccination.
The benefits of COVID-19 vaccination outweigh the known and potential risks.

After vaccination, continue to follow all current prevention measures recommended by CDC and based on latest COVID-19 Community Level data. Learn more about protecting your family from COVID-19.
Related Pages
Facts about COVID-19 Vaccines
Frequently Asked Questions about COVID-19 Vaccination
COVID-19 Vaccines for People Who Would Like to Have a Baby
How Do I Find a COVID-19 Vaccine?

Last Updated Aug. 17, 2022 Source: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases

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